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Breva 1100 Restoration Project

Discussion in 'BNS12 Chat & Tech' started by NPS, Mar 23, 2017.

  1. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    After test riding a Griso and Stelvio to replace the Breva, I decided to keep the Breva and refurbish her. I did not like the new bikes, sorry anyone who has one. Just not suited to me and I love the 1100 engine.

    I realise this is going to be difficult and I have given myself a year to complete it. I have a local renovation expert at Richmond, North Yorkshire to help with some of the work, advice and contacts.

    Here is what the bike looks like at the moment. I decided to start at the back and work forward, removing everything from the frame (needs a welding repair).

    20170323_164050_1.jpg

    Corrosion has been a problem as I used to commute in winter on salty roads. The fuel tank has blistered from Ethanol absorption and I already have a replacement. The stock silencer had a broken split thing where it joins to the catalyst box. The forks are badly damaged from corrosion. The seat needs replacing. The fasteners are dull or rusting and the wiring loom and pipes have a mold on them. Quite a job then.
    Not forgetting the wheel rims and brakes need attention. That's basically everything then, except the engine is fine at 28k.

    Here are some starting photos. I hope to pop back and ask folks where a particular part fits when I cant work it out. I have the parts manual and am making notes and taking photos as I go.

    If anyone shows an interest I will post more photos as I go. The refurbished items will be nice to see not doubt.

    20170323_164232_1.jpg

    20170323_164303_1.jpg

    20170323_164415_1.jpg

    20170323_164350_1.jpg
     
  2. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT Founder!

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    You aren't doing the bike any favors by riding on salt covered roads. Any metal frame part that is still serviceable should be stripped and powder coated. Any new painted part should get the same treatment. Powder coating is the only surface preparation I know of that will resist the salt. Also looks like new exhaust is in order. I don't know how you cold coat that to prevent failure but someone on the forum might. Treating the harness with isopropol alcohol and definitely bleach would kill the mold. Once you replace the fork tubes, full gaiters might protect them enough. I too will be keeping my 1100 Breva as the new bikes don't do anything for me either. Good luck with your restoration.
     
  3. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    Thank you John for those tips. I'm going to strip the frame to get it powder coated. One of the front, top engine mounting tubes needs a weld repair to replace the end section. I'm not intending to use it in winter in future. I ahve learnt that the Ethanol they put in petrol over here is the likely culprit of the fuel tank blistering. So I will be emptying the new tank over winter and leaving it to ventilate. I'm changing the colour from the stock grey to Red. Already have a replacement tank and silencer.
    For the wiring loop I'm intending to replace the cloth wrapping with my own wrapping. I have similar self-amalgamating cloth tape that looks very similar to that used on the Breva loom.
    I had a look at the wheels today. I need to remove the disks to have them blasted and redone by a specialist. The pan head hex bolts are imposible to remove without drilling out the centres. Have you done this before. Is it possible to remove the bolt material without the need for helicoiling?
     
  4. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT Founder!

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    To remove the rotors, heat the bolts with a torch. Get them pretty hot. That releases the thread locking material. They will then come out without distorting the heads. I replace them with good Allen screws once removed. Use blue loctite (242 formula) when you re-install the rotors.
     
  5. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    Thank you John.
     
  6. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT Founder!

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    Also before taping/covering the wire loom, you need to kill the mold. If you don't it will just continue to grow. A bleach and water solution will kill the mold. It will probably turn the harness white, but since you are going to use your product on it it really doesn't matter.
     
  7. Bisbonian

    Bisbonian Cruisin' Guzzisti

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    I used an impact driver to remove the rotor bolts on the back wheel of my 1200 Sport. They were amazingly resistant to coming out. I've attached a picture of what I started with. I ended up breaking this version, shame, and had to go with an electric impact driver to get the job done.

    For the front wheel, you will also want to remove the wheel bearings and seals. When I had my front wheel straightened the shop required them to come out and I'm sure the process will be similar for your work.
     

    Attached Files:

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  8. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    Thank you Bisbonian. I have bought a heat gun and have an impact driver similar to the one you show. Will give it a go soon.
    Yes I have been told by my friendly restoration shop that the wheels have to be stripped completely. Im going to re-coat with the standard colour or something similar. My front wheel has a mysterious air leak. The tyre needs replacing anyway but after not seeing any thrones or nails in the tyre I suspect the alloy valve that defiantly needs replacing as it is rotting away.
     
  9. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    Have spent about 8 hours so far dismantling. I started from the back and have hit a milestone of removed the wiring loom.
    The engine sump cover is now supported on wooden blocks and I'm ready to remove the front wheel and centre stand. 20170326_145947_1.jpg

    A little later I separated the frame from the engine.
    20170326_195001_1.jpg
     
  10. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    One observation, the swing arm bearings were well greased and had no damage. Same for the steering head bearings. Of course I have to remove them and will fit new bearings. A pity. Both sets of bearings have not been touched since new.

    I have a question about the wiring loom. What is the best thing to do with a conector block that has oxidised pins. My first idea would be to brush with a tooth brush and some switch cleaner. I imagine that when the two parts of a connector a plugged together, a metal to metal contact is made by the edges of the female in the male. This should scrape off the oxidation.
    Does anyone use anything more aggressive to get the contacts back to bright metal?
    Is there any benefit in doing this?
    Does anyone use a corrosion resistant application like petroleum jelly?

    Sorry about all the questions but I'm not sure what to do here.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
  11. FinnTech

    FinnTech Just got it firing!

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    Fellow Breva owner here from Finland. Keep the updates and photos coming, would like to see how you progress!

    For the connectors, I've only needed oxidation remover spray and some tiny brush (haven't been heavily corroded though). If possible, purchase a pack of super seal connectors with pins off Ebay and put new ones in (quite cheap).
     
  12. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    Thank you for the information on the connectors. Will keep the photos coming.
     
  13. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    Have sent of the first batch for powder coating. I have chosen black for these parts. I'm using close to standard colours but the frame will be black.

    20170401_090353_1.jpg

    The clutch is out. The intermediate plate I thought had a crack starting but it looks like I scratched it taking it off. The wear plates look quite worn. The teeth don't look too bad but will replace most parts.

    20170401_092319_1.jpg

    20170401_092256_1.jpg
     
  14. nel

    nel Cruisin' Guzzisti

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    Awesome big job a low miles. I like you are running my 06 B11 long term because the ergos a good and now no one wants a 90 000 miles bike. Your forks will need work I put 15W in my forks and over filled because the sliders were worn inside and I didn't replace them. A bit firm on the front end now but they still compress the full length on heavy braking. The plastic rear of the dash.baord will need repainting. I got a cheap carc mine was worn. Both rooker covers leak after a few miles I just keep tigthening the allen bolts down. Mine has a mistral system which shows no wear. I'm down south where we don't have as much salt. The old slapper still looks good. Got Artheritis in the hands now so a combined braking DCT bike would suit me.
     
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  15. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    I'm removing the cylinders and heads for inspection then blasting (external) and repainting. The left cylinder bore looks nicely run in at 28k miles. Still has the honing cris-cross marks.
    20170405_183251_1.jpg

    The LH exhaust valve has a slight grove in it where it makes contact with the rocker (LH valve even thought exhaust seat on the RH side). Is this something I should replace or can I get away with it?

    20170405_183202_1.jpg

    The piston is unusual. Is the brown material a friction reduction measure?

    20170405_183022_1.jpg
     
  16. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT Founder!

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    As to the groove in the valve stem. It depends if you should replace it. If the groove is so deep it throws off actual valve clearance, then yes, if not your valve adjustments will be close enough. That is if the groove is only a few 10 thousands of an inch, it should be OK
     
  17. NPS

    NPS Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Monthly Contributor!

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    It looks like only a 1 or 2 thou. Just a guess as slight marked ridge. Will try and measure it somehow.
     
  18. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT Founder!

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    If that much it should be replaced.
     
  19. scottmastrocinque

    scottmastrocinque Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Founder!

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    Ceramic coating for the exhaust will prevent that in the future. Here is a UK shop that I found.

    http://www.performance1coatings.com
     
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  20. scottmastrocinque

    scottmastrocinque Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Founder!

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    NO NO NO!!! STOP!!!

    It is not impossible. It's using the correct tools and technique and this does not include a torch, drill, impact driver or impact gun!!!

    First, get a steel flat head round drift (punch) that will fit inside of the hex head without damaging it. If the tires are still fitted to the rim, place the entire wheel on a solid bench or the floor with 2 pieces of wood (like 2"x4") which support the wheel by pressing against the tire. Otherwise lay the rim flat on a protective piece of rubber or carpet or a door mat and place on a solid bench or concrete floor.

    Now, using a 5lb small sledge hammer, place the drift inside of the hex bolt and with some gusto, rap the punch 3-5 times per bolt. This shock will shatter any corrosion but more importantly, any Locktite used on the bolt which is what is actually holding the bolt in so tight. Locktite can withstand tremendous torsional force (turning), that's what it is designed to do, but it shatters immediately upon lateral impact! This is why an impact driver does such a poor job at this; it's converting your lateral force into a torsional one, and the Locktite resists the crap out of that!

    Insert a standard socket head allen wrench into the bolt and turn counterclockwise, the bold will immediately let go and spin right out. If it doesn't, rap it again 3-5 times and I guarantee, it will let go easily. THE BOLTS ARE NOT REUSABLE - EVER- I DON'T CARE HOW 'GOOD" THEY LOOK. THROW THEM AWAY AND REPLACE WITH NEW BOLTS AND LOW STRENGTH (BLUE) LOCKTITE.

    This method works perfectly and does no damage to the wheel.

    Here is a video. Enjoy and Good Luck!

     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2017
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