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Airone gear selection

Discussion in 'MonoCylindrico' started by clive, May 15, 2018.

  1. clive

    clive Just got it firing!

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    Fitted the new clutch, along with a new pushrod and springs no problem. The trouble is I'm still having a bit of trouble with gear selection - I was hoping a new clutch etc would help this as the old one was dragging a bit even after a good clean.

    Sometimes the gear selection in perfect, inaudible hardly any resistance at the pedal. Like the proverbial knife through butter.

    Other times it baulks - especially first to second and emits the odd crunching noise and can be difficult to engage gear without letting the clutch out slightly to get things moving in the box - a bit like trying to select gears when the engine isn't running when you have to rock the bike back and forth to engage them properly.

    How good should they be, bearing in mind it's vintage and use over the years?

    Any suggestions, comments most welcome
     
  2. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT di Razza Pura

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    Try not pulling the clutch all the way. Pre-load the shifter and squeeze the clutch just enough to unload the drive train. The next gear should just engage smoothly.
     
  3. clive

    clive Just got it firing!

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    Hi John.
    I'll give it a try , as I said 60-70% of the shifts are great, really smooth, but the rest can be a bit tricky so it may well be my technique is not helping. All the bikes I've previously owned/ridden have been post '65 which require little more than clutch in, shift, clutch out. I'm kid of enjoying learning all the idiosyncrasies of riding an older bike, although I must say I am very impressed with the engineering that as gone into the Airone and it rides superb for something that is 60 plus years old. It must have been quite superb in its day.
    Thanks for the tip.
     
  4. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT di Razza Pura

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    The technique works with all bikes I've ever ridden. It makes for quick, smooth shifts.
     
  5. clive

    clive Just got it firing!

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    Well bugger me, you're quite correct John - it does indeed lead to a smooth positive shift.
    I just need to remember to use the technique whilst riding now.
    Having a V7II with an idiot proof left - one down the rest up, shift and the Airone with a right - one up and the rest down, can cause a man in his early fifties momentary mental stumbles whilst riding one bike then t'other.
     

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