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Cush Drive Maintenance Follow-Up

Discussion in 'Chat & Tech Info' started by Greg Field, Jul 13, 2009.

  1. Greg Field

    Greg Field Cruisin' Guzzisti

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    I posted a thread a few years ago about how to really make and keep your cush drive functional. Almost always when I disassemble one, they are frozen in place and nonfuctional for rust and lack of grease. There are several levels to which you can take it:

    The most basic is to pull it apart and grease it. If you do not do this, it will seize up and be non-functional. The one on my mutant Coppa Ductapio was in this state after maybe 12,000 miles (I did not write down the mileage but it was almost 2 years ago.)

    The next level is to grease and drill out the rubbers so they are not so hard.

    The right level, IME and IMO, is to grease it, remove half the pairs of pucks, and then drill them. This is what I always do for my bikes and bikes in my care on which the owner wants to really be nice to his splines. It makes an enormous difference in cush-dirve action that you can feel, and it drastically reduces spline wear. See the earlier thread for pix of that.

    After I got back from the National, I had to replace a roasted tire, so I though I's take the 5 minutes to open up the cush drive and see how it was holding up. Here's a pic of what I found:

    [​IMG]

    The pucks were moist with grease and perfect and pliable. The cush bearing surface was just starting to show surface rust. It definitely was still operating, as shown by the shiny spots, but it was crying out in pain for grease. I knocked off the surface rust with a cloth and greased everything well.

    Based on this, I'm going to grease it at every tire change, so at about every 7,000 miles on the Ballabio. If you haven't done yours in a while, or ever, I can garantee you it is running in pain, too.
     
  2. Muley

    Muley Cruisin' Guzzisti

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    Greg, could you inform the unenlightened which models of Guzzis this applies to and maybe give a brief description of how to take the cush drive apart for servicing? Might be good to include instructions on how to get it back together also:blush:

    TIA
     
  3. GrahamNZ

    GrahamNZ High Miler

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    Not to the CARC models sadly!
     
  4. Greg Field

    Greg Field Cruisin' Guzzisti

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    Muley: 850-T through Cal Vintage.
     
  5. Geoff

    Geoff Just got it firing!

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    All of this makes sense. The Rubber wedges are rock hard when you first take them out, and on my 25 year old bike were well jammed in.
    I got them out, drilled every one with one approx 10ml hole. And liberally greased them.

    And there was my error! I put too much grease on. Centrifugal force means that it finds its own way out. 500 or so miles later I still get a small spray of grease on the inside of the wheel rims.

    Geoff
     
  6. Brian UK

    Brian UK GT Reference

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    I see you have also removed 6 of the rubbers. I found that drilling AND removing half made it too soft, and caused vibration in the RH footrest (just like the UJ is gone, but it was a new one just fitted). All 12 drilled seems to work well.
     

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