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New V7/85 65hp for 2021

Mayakovski

High Miler
GT Famiglia
Joined
Dec 17, 2017
Messages
884
Location
Comox, BC, CANADA
Are you talking about the tax disc cost which equates to North American tag or plate fees ?
It doubles when you go from 750 to 850 wow !
The 744cc displacement was one of the benefits to getting my Anniversario as it helps keep the already expensive insurance more manageable, but over 750cc it yup, lots more money, and don't even think about over 1100cc unless you have real deep pockets.
 

DeadEye

GT Reference
GT di Razza Pura
Joined
Jun 13, 2020
Messages
1,505
Location
Eastern Ontario - Western Quebec
My guess is, V7III and V9 will go away as soon as stock is depleted... whenever that happens to be. I'd be surprised if they hadn't already stopped production of those models some time ago.

__Jason

I find it sort of annoying that a lot of manufacturers keep moving up the scale cc wise.
There still needs to be some 400/500/600 cc bikes to attract the entry level riders as well as those looking for something small and light & cheap to plate and insure.

The other pet peeve is bike sizing, the are all made for @#$&$# PORG’s ( Persons of restricted growth ).
Can someone please make a small displacement bike where someone over 6’ is not folded up like a pretzel !
 

dale decrescenzo

Tuned and Synch'ed
Joined
Sep 4, 2020
Messages
61
Location
Mo
Are you talking about the tax disc cost which equates to North American tag or plate fees ?
It doubles when you go from 750 to 850 wow !
but
Summary: 4.4% import tariff went to 49.4% in 1982 to save Harley, It was supposed to decrease over time, but i don't think it has.
there is also talk of increasing Euro import taxes 100% on 500cc units and smaller.
this is why i raised an eyebrow to the V7 crossing 750cc, it's a price marker...

revzilla.com/common-tread/will-new-import-tariffs-affect-the-us-motorcycle-market
 

jwtucker

V11 Sport 4 Life
Joined
Aug 13, 2011
Messages
229
Location
Philadelephia
The other pet peeve is bike sizing, the are all made for @#$&$# PORG’s ( Persons of restricted growth ).
Can someone please make a small displacement bike where someone over 6’ is not folded up like a pretzel !

My wife and I are both 6'2" (her with a 36" inseam). We both find the V7III perfectly comfortable. My main ergonomic gripe with it is that I don't like the upright position and wide stock bars - if her bike were mine, I'd have low clip-ons and rear-set pegs on it. Its all personal preference, though.

__Jason
 

Godfrey

High Miler
GT Famiglia
Joined
Oct 1, 2017
Messages
869
Location
San Francisco Bay Area
I received the announcement email from Moto Guzzi this morning. I'm happy with most of what I see, other than I prefer the style of a dual-gauge setup more than the single combination gauge setup, but that's just a minor thing.

I hear all this hoohah about the V7III being so woefully underpowered. To me, it's utter nonsense. Is "more" the only criteria that people judge a motorcycle or car by? The V7III is beautifully balanced: excellent handling, superbly tractable engine that pulls hard to redline in every gear and can keep pace with anything on the street other than Ricky Racer Squids. Who cares if it doesn't go 180 mph or pose paradoxes in Time from its FTL drive?

That said, the improvements in the V850 engine sound very good, and useful. Like most Moto Guzzi developments over the years, they're sensible and work to enhance what is already a very good motorcycle engine.

So the big question floating in my head is ... When do we see the Moto Guzzi V7 LeMans 850? :)

G
 

DeadEye

GT Reference
GT di Razza Pura
Joined
Jun 13, 2020
Messages
1,505
Location
Eastern Ontario - Western Quebec
My wife and I are both 6'2" (her with a 36" inseam). We both find the V7III perfectly comfortable. My main ergonomic gripe with it is that I don't like the upright position and wide stock bars - if her bike were mine, I'd have low clip-ons and rear-set pegs on it. Its all personal preference, though.

__Jason

Yes - The V7 does fit me but not that many others did - and forget about anything smaller cc fitting !
I was talking to a guy taller than I riding a Repsol 1000cc Honda and he said he could not ride for much more than an hour... without taking a break.
 

Mayakovski

High Miler
GT Famiglia
Joined
Dec 17, 2017
Messages
884
Location
Comox, BC, CANADA
I was talking to a guy taller than I riding a Repsol 1000cc Honda and he said he could not ride for much more than an hour... without taking a break.
It's not just tall people either, I have a female friend who is all of 5.5' and she rides a Ducati 848. She says about an hour (unless it's all twisties) and she is ready for the chiropractor.
 

HarrierGod

Tuned and Synch'ed
GT Contributor
Joined
Aug 1, 2017
Messages
43
Location
Colorado
GTM said:
I can promise you it's the V85TT engine. A simple timing chest cover swap is all that's needed on the engine. The wider swingarm/wheel from the V9 was added finally. Wish they had just used the V85TT mono-shock set up... though visually I can understand why they didn't.

I stand corrected. Upon closer inspection that is the v85 engine. The lower crank case casting and cylinder bolts look different than the v9.

I too am disappointed they didn’t monoshock it. Hopefully Guzzi is working on a sportier 850 with modern suspension.
 

Hippo-Drones

Cruisin' Guzzisti
Joined
Apr 16, 2019
Messages
213
Location
UK
I was proper excited when I heard about the V7 getting an 850 engine, I recorded a video of my thoughts and what it could mean from the factory in it's 100th anniversary year! :)

 

Bisbonian

Cruisin' Guzzisti
Joined
Aug 21, 2009
Messages
372
Location
Tucson, AZ
Yes - The V7 does fit me but not that many others did - and forget about anything smaller cc fitting !
I was talking to a guy taller than I riding a Repsol 1000cc Honda and he said he could not ride for much more than an hour... without taking a break.

While not in the same class, and not really a handsome bike, the Kawasaki Versys-X is a 300cc bike that fits taller people. I had one for a bit over a year and only sold it when I decided on the V85.
 

senecagreen

Tuned and Synch'ed
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Messages
36
Location
Oklahoma City
The whole attraction of the roamer for me was it resembled the standard style bikes of late 70's early 80's I remember. I looked at the CB1100 and the Z900RS and was leaning towards the Z900RS until I remembered what I don't like about inline 4's. The vibration/buzziness.

So now I was back to a twin or a triumph triple. I found the roamer that looked like a good canvas to recreate that standard style I was looking for and most of the look was there. Plus I get the Guzzi V twin which I had always admired along with the boxer twin. I looked at BMW but the roamer really had the look and I felt it was something that would be fairly easy for me to work on...

I don't care that it only has 55 hp. It is torquey enough for crusing around backroads which is what I do with it. My only complaint is the noisy trans most loudest in 3rd. Ireally like the sound, my bike came with mistrals.

The local shop said poor sales is why Guzzi is dropping the roamer and mgx. I wasn't going for the bobber look so the V9B wasn't for me.

I didn't buy the roamer new, so didn't help with sales. There just wasn't enough of a market guys like me who wanted a bike with the vintage standard style look. The new motor in the V7 will inject some power in to it and that has to be a good thing.

My rule of thumb has been 75hp is adequate, 100 is entertaining then you get up into bikes like the 2008 Aprilia Tuono I had and you get into thrilling. So the 55hp of the Roamer is okay for what I use it for.
 

Rzr

Just got it firing!
Joined
Dec 1, 2020
Messages
8
Location
Sarnia Ontario
Regarding “addition of steel elements in headstock area “ from press release . I’ve always have had strange handling in front end when hard over in curves with irregular pavement. Hopefully this will cure that problem as there is definitely some flex going on.
 

GTM®

Administrator
Staff member
GT di Razza Pura
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Messages
12,959
Location
Malibu
Regarding “addition of steel elements in headstock area “ from press release . I’ve always have had strange handling in front end when hard over in curves with irregular pavement. Hopefully this will cure that problem as there is definitely some flex going on.
That would be more related to suspension, fork diameter and geometry (slide your forks up if you haven't). I'll be curious to see what they did to the headstock.
 

dale decrescenzo

Tuned and Synch'ed
Joined
Sep 4, 2020
Messages
61
Location
Mo
I can't seem to find a part number breakdown manual on the V85TT like i have for the V7 and the V9.
thus i can't determine what is different between the V9 and the V85TT.
with both of these engines are sharing bore and stroke, and the same general architecture, its hard for me to get my head around the big performance increase.

assuming that they are both still using 2 valve heads, perhaps the V85TT is using bigger valves, higher compression, and a different cam. and there may be some changes with the electrical control mapping etc...

perhaps these changes will be retrofittable to the V9 platform ??
If I owned a V9, i would be looking deeply...
 

senecagreen

Tuned and Synch'ed
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Messages
36
Location
Oklahoma City
From the Piaggio/Guzzi Press release...

View attachment 21205
View attachment 21215

INTRODUCING THE NEW V7 850
1_hPLUQIJz2Iz7ltzB_RXS9SgVuBULtpRvlgKVFCvH2gzISCf-4dIsWeNLfunagMLYf8T9pPSMjw=s0-d-e1-ft

More than fifty years after the launch of its first unit, Moto Guzzi is proud to present a new and important evolution in the history of the V7, a prominent symbol of Italian motorbikes around the world.

The revamping is so profound that the progressive numbering in Roman numerals, which had characterized the various evolutions of the model since its return to the market in 2007, is gone. But the character and authenticity remain intact, as these values are destined to last over time and embedded in the genetic code of every Moto Guzzi.

View attachment 21206

Two versions are available: the patriarch, V7 Stone, with its strong and minimalistic style, is joined by the V7 Special, with its classic and elegant lines.

A new Moto Guzzi engine makes its début on the new V7, a close derivative of the one that powers the V85 TT. This is the most recent and modern drive built in Mandello, which guarantees better performance and overall greater efficiency in order to provide maximum riding pleasure, fun and reliability.

It has 25% more maximum power, going from the previous 52 hp at 6200 rpm to the current 65 hp at 6800 rpm. Maximum torque has also increased significantly, going from 44 ft-lbs at 4250 rpm to the outstanding value of 53 ft-lbs at 5000 rpm, with more than 80% of the torque already available at 3000 rpm.

View attachment 21207

Many new features have been introduced to improve stability and comfort, leaving the proverbial handling of the Moto Guzzi best-seller unaltered.

The frame has been evolved with the addition of steel elements in the headstock area, whereas the new pair of shock absorbers with greater travel and the new, two-tier saddle ensure greater comfort. With this same goal in mind, brand new rider footpeg support are used.

Moto Guzzi V7 Stone has the new, full LED light system with the headlight that includes a DRL in the shape of the Moto Guzzi Eagle, whereas the new instrument cluster is perfectly in line with the look of a minimalist motorcycle, entirely digital on a single, circular dial. The aluminum wheel rims, in the sporty style that equips the Stone, are also new; the rear rim is shod with a wider 150/70 tire.

1_hPLUQIJz2Iz7ltzB_RXS9SgVuBULtpRvlgKVFCvH2gzISCf-4dIsWeNLfunagMLYf8T9pPSMjw=s0-d-e1-ft

Discover more at MotoGuzzi.com

The most noticeable difference from the previous-gen V9 engine is an increase in horsepower; our V85 TT Adventure produced 66.3 peak rear-wheel horsepower at 7,900 rpm and 48.6 lb-ft of torque at 5,300 on the Jett Tuning dyno, compared with 51.3 horsepower and 47.3 lb-ft of torque from the 853cc V9 Bobber we tested in ...Jan 29, 2020

The above is from Rider magazine dyno tests. My guess is this new motor is bigger bore, shorter stroke than the V9 motor and that's how they get more power vs the old V7 motor.

I don't know the bore and stroke difference between the V9 and V85TT. Or is it just 4 valve heads and cams. Maybe Todd can weigh in as he is the resident subject matter expert.
 

GTM®

Administrator
Staff member
GT di Razza Pura
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Messages
12,959
Location
Malibu
Well covered in this thread, start here; https://www.guzzitech.com/forums/threads/v85-tt-info.17940/page-4#post-141700

As a recap for this thread...
The V85 engine is an air-cooled transverse 90° V twin with OHV distribution and two valves per cylinder. Engine capacity is 853cc and can boast an output ratio of almost 100 HP/liter while delivering 80 HP and 59 ft-lbs of torque at 5,000 rpm (power @ crankshaft, not rear wheel), with 90% of the torque already available at 3,750 rpm. Part of the power increase is via new MM 7SM ECU/EFI w/52mm throttle body, with multimap Ride-by-Wire throttle control. This is the first Moto Guzzi small block engine that can easily reach 8,000 rpm.

The crankcase is a new design and is stiffer, in order to fulfill its new role as a stressed member in the frame. Moto Guzzi further strengthened the design with frame connections and strengthening elements in the internal stud bolt area. Lubrication involves a semi dry sump, with two coaxial pumps tasked with oil delivery and recovery that removes the need for an oil cooler, thus reducing the overall weight.

The oil circuit is totally new and features holes of different diameters, with one of the two pumps transferring lubrication from the crankcase chamber to the sump. The latter is reduced in size to increase ground clearance and allow for assembly of the protective aluminum under-sump. The whole crankshaft is new and, together with the piston rods, also new, allows for a reduction in weight of almost 30% with respect to other small block engines while upping throttle response speed and significantly reducing any vibration.

Cylinders are of reduced height, while new and efficient oil passages and a brand-new fastening system to the crankcase ensure robustness and reliability. Low-profile pistons are used while the flywheel and generator have been boosted.

Significant work has been done on the gearbox to make it smoother and more precise. Ratios are new and a triple ring system is introduced for the first time: a synchronizer that reduces gear noise to a minimum, particularly that of first gear. In addition, the gears gain flexible coupling, for even smoother final transmission at the PTO shaft, this too new.
 

Louisv97

Cruisin' Guzzisti
Joined
Jul 24, 2019
Messages
311
Location
Orange County
Well covered in this thread, start here; https://www.guzzitech.com/forums/threads/v85-tt-info.17940/page-4#post-141700

As a recap for this thread...
The V85 engine is an air-cooled transverse 90° V twin with OHV distribution and two valves per cylinder. Engine capacity is 853cc and can boast an output ratio of almost 100 HP/liter while delivering 80 HP and 59 ft-lbs of torque at 5,000 rpm (power @ crankshaft, not rear wheel), with 90% of the torque already available at 3,750 rpm. Part of the power increase is via new MM 7SM ECU/EFI w/52mm throttle body. This is the first Moto Guzzi small block engine that can easily reach 8,000 rpm.

The crankcase is a new design and is stiffer, in order to fulfill its new role as a stressed member in the frame. Moto Guzzi further strengthened the design with frame connections and strengthening elements in the internal stud bolt area. It also features ports in order to check the oil level in the lower semi-crankcase. Lubrication involves a semi dry sump, with two coaxial pumps tasked with oil delivery and recovery that removes the need for an oil cooler, thus reducing the overall weight.

The oil circuit is totally new and features holes of different diameters, with one of the two pumps transferring lubrication from the crankcase chamber to the sump. The latter is reduced in size to increase ground clearance and allow for assembly of the protective aluminum under-sump. The whole crankshaft is new and, together with the piston rods, also new, allows for a reduction in weight of almost 30% with respect to other small block engines while upping throttle response speed and significantly reducing any vibration.

Cylinders are of reduced height, while new and efficient oil passages and a brand-new fastening system to the crankcase ensure robustness and reliability. Low-profile pistons are used while the flywheel and generator have been boosted. Electronic management is further entrusted to a multimap Ride-by-Wire throttle control.

Significant work has been done on the gearbox to make it smoother and more precise. Ratios are new and a triple ring system is introduced for the first time: a synchronizer that reduces gear noise to a minimum, particularly that of first gear. In addition, the gears gain flexible coupling, for even smoother final transmission at the PTO shaft, this too new.
Shit, so it was complete overhaul at that point. makes sense. Makes me want to have another V7 in the stable
 

senecagreen

Tuned and Synch'ed
Joined
Oct 19, 2020
Messages
36
Location
Oklahoma City
So is 80x74 for the V7 and
84x77 for the V9 correct?
Is the V85tt and this new motor for the V7 also 84x77?
An oversquare engine explains the rev's and I see from your explaination where they got the power.

What is the bore and stroke of the 820cc kit you offer for the V7?
 
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