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Refurbishing my 2007 Norge

Discussion in 'BNS12 Chat & Tech' started by mylovelyhorse, May 15, 2019.

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  1. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    Tomorrow’s activity will be to apply some heat to the right upper exhaust retainer and see if I can get it off. I think the bottom one will be removed with a Dremel, although maybe heat and a pair of mole grips will do it...
     
  2. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT di Razza Pura

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    You have done well. It is good the studs came out. New studs, washers, nuts, and gaskets shouldn't be too expensive. You can use double nuts to set the studs. When you are ready to put it together, you shouldn't need anything on the gaskets, but I would apply anti seize to the studs where the nuts go, but not where the studs go into the heads.
     
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  3. Bill Hagan

    Bill Hagan GT Reference GT Famiglia

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    You must have a very bad person in a previous life. :giggle:

    Seriously, impressive work.

    Bill
     
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  4. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    Two of them haven’t yet, but thank you

    Already got/ordered them.

    Absolutely. I will be fitting dome nuts, not the standard open things. I have a set of the standard nuts and it’s shocking how much the old ones have corroded away.
     
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  5. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    To be fair I’ve been quite bad in this life ;)

    Thanks
     
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  6. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    So today I’ve had an easier job to do than I expected.

    I used my Dremel to slice a slot into what’s left of the nuts and then whacked them with a cold steel chisel & hammer to get them off [​IMG]

    The studs looked awful:
    [​IMG]

    but after 20 seconds of heat from the blowtorch and then getting a good grip with a pipe wrench, out they came. They were, frankly, a bit reluctant, but they came out all the same. The exhaust gasket again looked pretty rubbish:
    [​IMG]

    Goodness knows how long that has been in there - maybe for the life of the bike.

    I’m not sure what to do next. I shan’t be changing any fluids without warming the bike up and I think it might be a bit noisy at the moment <G>. I’ve things on order to replace the studs, nuts etc. and they won’t turn up for a day or two. I could look into why the horn isn’t working, I guess, but frankly I think that can wait until I’ve got the front end apart - I want to replace the fork oil. I was thinking of HyperPro springs too but they’re £120 and with the recent expenditure on the exhaust headers being the same amount I think that budget is now "otherwise allocated” as they say.

    So I could get one of the forks off and start replacing fork oil, but that’s another of those no-idea-how-long-it-will-take jobs that may include many issues to resolve so, um, dunno.
     
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  7. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    I decided to take the nose fairing off (easy) and remove the front mudguard so that I could start on the forks. One of the bolts holding the front mudguard snapped off, thoroughly corroded into place. Arsebiscuits :(

    For today I have called a halt to proceedings - it’s time for tea, Moto2 & MotoGP. I will go back to work on the forks later in the week or when time (and grandson’s visit) next allows.
     
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  8. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    Here's the problematic mudguard mounting:

    EA74A6BE-663F-458C-AC46-BE3D0A01F5F4.jpeg

    And now this has happened:

    5FFC4DD4-1B32-45E2-B467-D18194D98452.jpeg

    The second is really irritating as it took no force at all to snap off the ball of the Allen key :(
     
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  9. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    And so the work on the Norge resumes... slowly. The exhaust on the Norge is getting some prep today - I have all the necessary parts now (I hope!) and a little time to do a little work on the bike. So I have taken the replacement downpipe-to-can junction piece and carefully scrubbed off any loose metal. The old (and damaged) gaskets have been removed and (not cheap) replacements sourced. I have taped off the parts of the junction piece that I don't want to paint (mounting points and where the oxygen sensor screws in). I have wiped it all down with white spirit. Soon there shall be an application of stove paint. It says it's for wood burners and parts that achieve a temperature of up to 600oC so hopefully it'll go on OK and stay on. I don't want to have to go back to this part again, it's too much of a hassle.

    Some pictures after coat 1 of 3 has been applied.

    SqdHuAY.jpg
    jAZTIG2.jpg
    WqXIpaW.jpg
    IRpYZ6s.jpg
    0zR4am1.jpg
     
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  10. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    Next question from me: is it easy to change the alternator belt? As I’m going to do the steering head bearings it seems to me I might as well do the belt as well.

    As far as I can see the job involves taking the oil cooler and the horns off. Anything else about the job worth noting?
     
  11. Kevin.NZ

    Kevin.NZ Cruisin' Guzzisti

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    The oil cooler doesn't need to come off, just unbolted and shifted. I used a 4PK725 and the adjuster ended up half way. The Alternator pivot bold was a bit fiddly to reach. This job will be a walk in the park for you seeing what you've been doing lately.
     
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  12. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    Well that's a help - thanks. Good to know.

    That's an alternative to the M-G belt, I believe. I have a new belt from Gutsibits, bought before I learned there was an alternative so I shall fir that this time.

    Always good to know it's not difficult - thanks.
     
  13. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    I've been making a list - not of naughty and nice (it's all naughty as far as I can see) - but of things I know for sure need doing on the Norge. In no particular order the list is:
    • Clean up cylinder heads
    • Change fork oil
    • Replace rocker cover gaskets
    • Replace double conrod on rear suspension (probably with this: https://tinyurl.com/y6g3brfn)
    • Replace bearings in rear suspension linkage wishbone
    • Change brake fluid in front brakes
    • Bleed rear brakes
    • Replace rough looking oil cooler hoses
    • Refit exhaust
    • Change engine oil
    • Repairs to fairing (one broken fastener, other issues may be found)
    • Anything else that comes up
    I have already decided not to refit the exhausts until late in this list so that they don't get damaged while e.g. the forks are off for new oil or the rear suspension is in bits. Apart from that I'm vaguely daunted by the list but also wondering what order to do things in. I guess the cylinder head cleaning is first, specially around the ports, however after that it's all really down to how much time I have to spare.

    EDIT:
    I’ve been thinking about it. While the exhaust system is off I will clean up the area around the exhaust ports so it can go back on better. I’ll also whip the rocker covers off and replace the gaskets. The valves shouldn’t need doing after only 2,500 miles but if I have a moment spare (it’s a busy weekend) I shall just check the clearances. Might as well. Then prop the bike up and whip the forks off to change the oil in there. It’ll be an every-evening-in-the-garage activity after the weekend - or at least as many evenings as the Slim Controller will permit - for a while.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2019
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  14. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    I could really do with some advice here...

    This photograph was taken this afternoon, it’s the right hand cylinder exhaust port:

    [​IMG]

    I have some paper roll stuffed in there to keep crud from going into the cylinder.

    As can be clearly seen one of the dreaded previous owners (or a mechanic they employed) has liberally used some sort of exhaust paste / goo on the surface the gasket seats onto and round the walls of the port. It’s very solid and I’m finding it very hard to get it off. I am not keen on damaging the underlying metal for obvious reasons.

    Has anyone any suggestions for what I might do to soften up this baked on gasket goo that wouldn’t damage the cylinder head?

    I was thinking of painting it with PlusGas or with the ethanol/ATF mix previously suggested as an anti-seize fluid - not out of any great hope it might work but just to try to do something. I want a good clean mating surface before I bung a new gasket in there. [NB: sprayed the surfaces with ethanol/ATF mix last night & will again this morning]

    Suggestions gratefully received!!
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
  15. kiwi dave

    kiwi dave GT Reference

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    I've used a brass revolving brush on the end of a cordless drill with good results and no damage. Cordless drill is preferred as it can be reversed.

    Take your time, and you shouldn't damage anything.
     
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  16. Raven

    Raven Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    I would second that. The brass is softer than the port metal and won't damage it. A dremel tool will work well also.
     
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  17. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    Thanks to both of you for that suggestion. I had forgotten but I do have a Dremel and a box that came with it with a whole bunch of tips of one sort or another - there’ll be something useful in there to go at it with.
     
  18. Brian UK

    Brian UK GT Reference

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    I suspect what you have there is compacted aluminium oxide. That bike must have been kept next to the sea somewhere.
    But the same method of removal sould work.

    Don't think I have ever seen a bike as young as that with so much corrosion. Bear in mind my Norge is the same age and lives ouside under a shelter all the time.
     
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  19. mylovelyhorse

    mylovelyhorse Cruisin' Guzzisti GT Contributor

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    No idea. I still think it's baked on exhaust paste or similar. I've had a spell with the Dremel today and the ports now look different.

    Left hand port:
    [​IMG]

    Right hand port:
    [​IMG]

    Neither looks beautiful, both look better than they did. I'll do a spot more with the Dremel and then call it a day on the ports. Next job will be to get the bike properly secured and the right hand fork out. I'm going to change the fork oil and not the springs (£££). While I have the fork off I shall try to drill out the remains of the front mudguard bolt that snapped off.

    This bike certainly has experienced a lot of corrosion over it's life, as well, frankly, as some bodged & neglectful 'maintenance'.
     
  20. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT di Razza Pura

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    Those Allen screws are stainless. I suggest you take it to a machinist and have him use a carbide tip to drill it out. Drilling by hand just won't work and those sliders are expensive. When you install new screws do coat the threads with an anti seize material.
     
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