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GTM Secondary Air Supply (SAS) V7-9 Block-off Kit

GTM®

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GT di Razza Pura
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If you own a ‘17+ V7 III or V9, they all have an air feed circuit to the exhaust port of the cylinder heads. The system is part of tricking tail pipe emission testers into thinking its running leaner than it actually is. It’s also a likely failure point in time as it is a plastic pump with rubber hoses, and part of the cause of closed throttle popping if you modify your bike (outside of the major fueling issues). Recommended to be used with our Performance Flash. The block-off kit linked below eliminates the pump and lines. It comes with CNC’ed aluminum block off plates shown below, pump elim plug and a vacuum cap for the hose you will remove at the air box.
They are online here; https://gtmotocycles.com/products/gt-motocycles-v7iii-v9-sas-air-block-off-kit -- in very limited productions runs. If in stock, grab one while they last. V85TT info HERE

Installation YouTube video link HERE - or play below.



 
Maybe a dumb question, but installation of this without having a modified bike of any sort (other than GTM flash) won't cause any running issues? It would be nice just to get rid of the extra plumbing.
 
Maybe a dumb question, but installation of this without having a modified bike of any sort (other than GTM flash) won't cause any running issues?
Nope.
 
A few questions if I may:

1. Apart from the "popping" issue (which I don't have yet) is there any performance hit with or without this system remaining intact?
2. Is there any significant weight saving?
3. Is the standard system prone to failure/partial failure?

I am always tempted by things which keep life more simple.
 
A few questions if I may:
1. Apart from the "popping" issue (which I don't have yet) is there any performance hit with or without this system remaining intact?
2. Is there any significant weight saving?
3. Is the standard system prone to failure/partial failure?
I am always tempted by things which keep life more simple.
1. Yes
2. Minimal but yes
3. I would say yes as the lines are basic (crap) rubber and will fail in time.
 
Just finished installing the kit on my Special. I pulled the tank off to make it easier to get to the fasteners. And, when you do yours, pulling the air valve out from the left side is easiest, it is only mounted on 2 plastic arms. Hardest part was the right side, because the throttle cable support was in the way of the allen wrench. Probably easiest way to remove that thing would be to drop the engine!, but I got it, with only a bit of bloodied fingers. I hated to see the sticker on the ABS pump emblazoned with "Aprilia China". The GT kit is beautifully made and fits perfectly.
 
... but I got it, with only a bit of bloodied fingers.
Are you saying that you had this much difficulty even with the tank off? If that's the case, who are all the resident contortionists telling me/the rest of us that there's no need to remove the tank to do this job? Even in the photos posted I have no idea what I'm looking at. Are the uninitiated here supposed to do this by feel, or should we just use the force?
 
I've been sick and haven't uncovered Racer since I returned from my trip. However, I looked at it pretty carefully when I was evaluating the kit ... I'm not convinced that it's all that difficult to install the kit, and will likely do it without removing the tank somewhere in the next few days.

I'll let you know whether Racer bloodies me in the process (but usually it won't since I wear mechanix gloves most of the time, for a better grip on my tools etc. :D ).
 
It really is easy, but with the frame at top dead center, and the angle of the air plugs, prevented me from using allen sockets because of their length. So, I used regular little 90 degree allen wrenches, 1/4 turn at a time. Took off my gloves because their wasn't room on the right side with the furshlugginer throttle cable security bracket assembly, which is held on with one simple bolt and one below that also allows no room for a socket, only a short 8mm wrench 1/4 turn at a time. The right side really is the only issue. Lucky we only have to do it once.
 
but with the frame at top dead center, and the angle of the air plugs, prevented me from using allen sockets because of their length.
Ah yes, in my pic above you can see I used a ball-end allen socket, or you can use a stubby version.
 
So the hose that goes to the airbox, once removed, do you plug up that hole in the airbox? Or is it on the dirty side of the air filter so no worries?
 
So the hose that goes to the airbox, once removed, do you plug up that hole in the airbox? Or is it on the dirty side of the air filter so no worries?

It's on the clean side because air drawn from there and injected into the exhaust port will certainly find its way back into the valve area and combustion chamber area due to the pressure waves that traverse the length of the exhaust track. A cap is provided to block it off.
 
Are you saying that you had this much difficulty even with the tank off? If that's the case, who are all the resident contortionists telling me/the rest of us that there's no need to remove the tank to do this job? Even in the photos posted I have no idea what I'm looking at. Are the uninitiated here supposed to do this by feel, or should we just use the force?

I've been sick and haven't uncovered Racer since I returned from my trip. However, I looked at it pretty carefully when I was evaluating the kit ... I'm not convinced that it's all that difficult to install the kit, and will likely do it without removing the tank somewhere in the next few days.

I'll let you know whether Racer bloodies me in the process (but usually it won't since I wear mechanix gloves most of the time, for a better grip on my tools etc. :D ).

I finally did the SAS block-off installation yesterday on the V7III Racer and posted the tools and procedure I used, but to likely the wrong thread. So I thought I'd post it in this thread too...

I didn't wear my gloves (forgot to) and did manage to nick one finger lightly. Barely a drop of blood however... :)

Tools:
  • 10mm combination spanner
  • T20 Torx driver
  • 3mm, 4mm hex drivers
  • stubby 4mm hex driver or key
  • large/long screwdriver
  • 1/4" drive ratchet, breaker bar, and 6" extension
  • 4mm allen wrench
  • Angle jaw pliers
  • Bent-nose needle nose pliers
  • diagonal cutters
Procedure:
  1. Run the tank down (or drain it down) so that it's easy to manipulate
  2. Set the bike upright using a stand.
  3. Remove seat.
  4. Remove tank securing bolt (at the rear of the tank under the front of the seat)
  5. Slide the tank back about 2-3 inches, then lift at the front. Lift the tank and settle it over to the left on the frame so that you have access to the right-hand cylinder head and under-tank area (right-hand and left-hand are oriented such that you are sitting on the bike).
  6. Using the bent-needle-nose pliers, remove the clip holding the tube that goes from the air box to the SAS system valve (right-hand rear of the engine bay) and pull the tube off its fitting.
  7. Fit the provided sealing cap to the airbox fitting.
  8. Remove the sparkplug wire cover (4x 3mm hex) and the sparkplug lead guide bolts (T20 Torx), then pull the plug cap off so that you can move the plug wire and guides out of the way for access to the other bits.
  9. Using the bent-needle-nose pliers, remove the clip holding the front of the airbox tube from the SAS system valve, and pull the tube off. Set aside.
  10. Using the bent-needle-nose pliers, slide the clip holding the tube onto the cylinder head fitting down the tube, and pull the tube off the fitting.
  11. Undo the two 4mm hex bolts retaining the fitting to the cylinder head. (Access is limited, so a stubby allen key or driver helps here, as does patience.)
  12. Remove the fitting and use the angle jaw pliers to pull the reed valve out if it is stuck.
  13. Fit the reed valve into the blanking cap.
  14. Fit the blanking cap to the cylinder head and tighten the two 4mm hex bolts. (I put some Loctite Blue on them.)
  15. Reposition the tank over to the right on the frame to permit access to the left-hand cylinder head area.
  16. Remove the sparkplug wire cover and the sparkplug lead guide bolts, then pull the plug cap off so that you can move the plug wire and guides out of the way for access to the other bits.
  17. Using the bent-needle-nose pliers, slide the clip holding the tube onto the cylinder head fitting down the tube, and pull the tube off the fitting. (This is where I found having the large/long screwdriver handy ... I used it to lever the tube clip around so I could grab the ends with the pliers and move it.)
  18. At this point, slide the SAS valve off its mounting towards you.
  19. Disconnect the sensor electrical plug.
  20. Wiggle the SAS valve with the two cylinder head lines out of the bike and set aside
  21. Remove the fitting and use the angle jaw pliers to pull the reed valve out if it is stuck.
  22. Fit the reed valve into the blanking cap.
  23. Fit the blanking cap to the cylinder head and tighten the two 4mm hex bolts. (I put some Loctite Blue on them.)
  24. Connect the provided SAS simulator plugin to the electrical harness and zip tie it to the SAS valve mounting point. Use the diagonal cutters to remove the zip tie's free end.
  25. Refit the left hand cylinder's plug wire guides, plug wire, and plug wire cover.
  26. Reposition the tank over to the left and refit the right hand cylinder's plug wire guides, plug wire, and plug wire cover.
  27. Lift the tank, center it on the mounting rubbers, and slide it forward to seat it in place properly. Be sure not to trap or pinch any of the under-tank electrical harness.
  28. Refit the tank securing rear bolt.
  29. Insert the ignition key and start the bike, checking for leaks and proper operation.
  30. Re-install the seat.
I was initially going to remove the tank, but I realized there was plenty of room to work with the tank just lifted and settled over to the right and then the left, so no need to undo the fuel connections and pump electricals unnecessarily. Removing the tank doesn't really make any more space for the bits you have to reach.

The whole job, end to end, took me three hours ... I think if I were to do it another time on another bike, it would take a little more than half that. Most of the extra time was spent figuring out how to get access to the particular bolt or clip I needed to work on. I wrote the procedure above so that others would have a clearer idea of what to look for.

And sorry: I was focusing on getting the job done in a limited amount of time and completely forgot to take any photographs.

Racer runs better than ever now, no more barking and popping. :D

enjoy!
G
 
After the block off kit, I am happy mainly because I like gadgets, but feel better without all the apparatus under the tank. Since I still have stock exhaust, I had no issues with popping or backfiring. Just running with the GTM mapping makes my bike one of the most satisfying rides I have had in 53 years of riding.
 
So for the couple of you who have installed the kit, how about a ride report? Have you noticed any differences post-installation?
 
So for the couple of you who have installed the kit, how about a ride report? Have you noticed any differences post-installation?

See the last line on Godfreys how to post:
Racer runs better than ever now, no more barking and popping. :D
 
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