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'74 Eldorado Police Model

Discussion in 'Loop & Tonti' started by J_C, Jan 29, 2019.

  1. J_C

    J_C Just got it firing!

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    Hey guys. This is my first post here, so I'll share a bit of background on my Guzzi, before I ask my question. A couple of years ago, my dad gave me his '74 Eldorado Police model. He had owned it since '76, So I grew up touring the country on the back of this thing and had been begging him to give it to me, one day, since I was 10 years old. So, kind of a big deal, haha. Its mostly original, with a few customized bits. The floorboards, tank cap, and hubcap are from an old Harley, the seat and front fender are both custom made, National Cycle windshield, and the exhausts have been modified with the baffles removed and tips welded onto the ends. I'll leave a recent pic down below. It had been in storage for 10+ years when I got it, but had been rebuilt right before going into storage, so some fresh gas, a new battery, and some cleaner down the carbs was all it took to make her fire up on the first try.

    Anyways, I've had the bike on the road for about a year and a half, and I'm about to start bringing some new life to the old girl with a few new accessories. So far, I've got a solo seat and rear rack from Harper's on the way, and a set of new bags from eBay that I'm going to put on for now. My question is this: is there anyone who makes a sissy bar and rear rack for a dual seat for these bikes? I haven't had any luck finding any. Thanks in advance for any and all info!
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2019
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  2. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT di Razza Pura

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    Back in the 70s a luggage rack was readily available. It even had braces that went to where the rear fender bolted to the frame tab. I had one but have since sold it. I can't remember the maker as it wasn't factory but an after marked item. You might call Harper's Moto Guzzi. They may have some hanging around.
     
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  3. J_C

    J_C Just got it firing!

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    Thanks for the info! I had been thinking about calling them to see if they have or know of any, so I'll definitely do so.

    Any idea about a backrest?
     
  4. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT di Razza Pura

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    A back rest would bolt to the luggage rack. Or put a truck with pad on the luggage rack to get the same result plus more storage.
     
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  5. J_C

    J_C Just got it firing!

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    I've thought about dressing it out, like it used to be, which would solve my problem with a touring pack. My dad had a HUGE ferring with hardbags and a travel pack, along with some custom aluminum light up GUZZI panels under the hardbags. I'll have to dig around for and old picture. She was pretty sweet.

    The thing that makes me hesitant to start putting stuff like that back on is that I read one article in which the guy claimed that the bike tends to become unstable and get into death wobbles when riding solo with all of that stuff added. Do you have any idea if there is any truth to this? I only wonder about it, because the one and only wreck this bike ever had was when my dad was riding solo up to Sturgis and got into a wobble he couldn't recover from. That's when all of the old stuff came off, as it was mostly trashed. Bright side: all of that fiberglass saved the rest of the bike from damage.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2019
  6. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT di Razza Pura

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    I had a 73 Eldorado. Some of them would do the wobble, some didn't. With a handlebar mounted fairing it would wobble at over 70 mph. Switched over to a Harley style windshield and the wobble stopped. The bike also had a trunk and bags. Just make sure the steering head bearings are in good shape and the swing arm is centered and you should be OK.
     
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  7. Amboman

    Amboman Cruisin' Guzzisti

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  8. J_C

    J_C Just got it firing!

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    Thanks for the tip. This one being a 74 police model, it came stock eith a damper on it. The one on it was long dead, so I replaced it, last season. So would balancing the rear weight with a ferring on the front end help at all?
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2019
  9. Amboman

    Amboman Cruisin' Guzzisti

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    Depending on the fairing, it could make things worse. The vintage Bates, Wixoms, Calafias, etc. all seem to make a wobble more likely. Even a police type "tombstone" windshield can effect stability.
     
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  10. john zibell

    john zibell Moderator Staff Member GT di Razza Pura

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    JC, remember this saying when loading a bike. Bricks in the saddle bags, and feathers in the trunk. That is keep all weight as low as possible.
     
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